Honeymoon Cabin

Most likely, one man built this log cabin without assistance in the 1930s. Probably of Scandinavian origin, he used peeled logs of diminishing size for the walls—largest at the bottom—smaller at the top. The small door doesn’t reflect the size of the builder; rather it helped keep the heat inside. Cement caulked the walls on the outside, but on the inside narrow aspen boughs, nailed between the logs, provided extra insulation. One wall has no opening. Snow would have been shoveled against this wall for even more protection from winter cold. Corrugated galvanized steel covers the roof.

A "survival cabin," this type of structure allowed a person to construct a cabin using trees from the nearby forest. Those nearby trees also fueled his cook stove and provided heat.

Directions: You will find the Honeymoon Cabin next to the Myers Cabin, behind the Schoolhouse Museum at 403 LaBonte Street in Dillon.